Origin and Narrative History of of Ginger,Traditional and Current Uses.

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Origin and Narrative History of of Ginger,Traditional and Current Uses.

Origin and Narrative History of of Ginger.

Brief Narrative history of "Ginger".

Ginger Root Zingiber OfficinalisCAS 84696-15-1  The word ginger comes from the ancient Sanskrit singabera, meaning 'shaped like a horn'. It first appeared in the writings of Confucius in the 5th century BC. and it has been used medicinally in the West for at least 2000 years. It was introduced by the Spaniards to the Americas and is now cultivated extensively in the West Indies. The Portuguese introduced it to West Africa. It was traditionally used to warm the stomach and dispel chills. In the 18th century it was added to remedies to modify their action and to reduce their irritant effects upon the stomach. Ginger is still used in this way in China to reduce the toxicity of some herbs. The Chinese prescribe ginger tea for delayed menstruation. It is rich in vitamin C, and Chinese mariners ate it fresh to ward off scurvy.

Ginger Origin and Its Spread.

 As the rhizome of Zingiber officinale Rosc., a perennial herb, of family Zingiberaceae, probably native to southeastern Asia, it is produced everywhere and picked and dug in Autumn and Winter. Its generic name Zingiber is derived from the Greek zingiberis, which comes from the Sanskrit name of the spice, singabera.

 Ginger Root Zingiber OfficinalisCAS 84696-15-1Its use in India and China has been known from ancient times, and by the 1st century AD traders had taken ginger into the Mediterranean region. By the 11th century it was well known in England. The Spaniards brought it to the West Indies and Mexico soon after the conquest, and by 1547 ginger was being exported from Santiago to Spain.

 The leafy stems of ginger grow about a metre high. The leaves are 15 to 30 cm long, elongate, alternate in two vertical rows, and arise from sheaths enwrapping the stem. The flowers are in dense, conelike spikes about 2 cm thick and 4 to 6 cm long composed of overlapping green bracts, which may be edged with yellow. Each bract encloses a single, small, yellow-green and purple flower.

 Ginger is propagated by planting rootstalk cuttings and has been under this type of cultivation for so long that it no longer goes to seed. Harvesting is done simply by lifting the rhizomes from the soil, cleansing them, and drying them in the sun. The dried ginger rhizomes are irregular in shape, branched or palmate. Their colour varies from dark yellow through light brown to pale buff. Ginger may be unscraped; partly scraped; or scraped or peeled.
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 The dried rhizome of Zingiber officinale Rosc., a perennial plant, of the family Zingiberaceae. Probably native to southeastern Asia, its aromatic, pungent rhizome (underground stem) is used as a spice, flavouring, food, and medicine. Its generic name Zingiber is derived from the Greek zingiberis, which comes from the Sanskrit name of the spice, singabera.

 Its use in India and China has been known from ancient times, and by the 1st century AD traders had taken ginger into the Mediterranean region. By the 11th century it was well known in England. The Spaniards brought it to the West Indies and Mexico soon after the conquest, and by 1547 ginger was being exported from Santiago to Spain.

 The spice has a slightly biting taste and is used, usually dried and ground, to flavour breads, sauces, curry dishes, confections, pickles, and ginger ale. The fresh rhizome, green ginger, is used in cooking. The peeled rhizomes may be preserved by boiling in syrup. In elsewhere, slices of ginger are eaten between dishes or courses to clear the palate. Ginger is used medically to treat flatulence and colic.

 The leafy stems of ginger grow about a metre high. The leaves are 15 to 30 centimetres long, elongate, alternate in two vertical rows, and arise from sheaths enwrapping the stem. The flowers are in dense, conelike spikes about 2 cm thick and 4 to 6 cm long, composed of overlapping green bracts, which may be edged with yellow. Each bract encloses a single, small, yellow-green and purple flower.

 Ginger is propagated by planting rootstalk cuttings and has been under this type of cultivation for so long that it no longer goes to seed. The dried ginger rhizomes are irregular in shape, branched or palmate. Their colour varies from dark yellow through light brown to pale buff. Ginger may be unscraped (with all of its cork layer); partly scraped; or scraped or peeled (with all of its cork, epidermis, and hypodermis removed).

 Ginger Root Zingiber OfficinalisCAS 84696-15-1In China, ginger is cultivated and mainly produced in the provinces Sichuan, Guangdong, Guangxi, Hubei, Guizhou, Fujian, etc. Harvested in winter by lifting the rhizomes from the soil, then is cleaned, sliced and dried in the sun or baked at low heat until dry for use when raw.

 China is said to be the native home of ginger, and as such, the Chinese are well versed in its ability to sort out problem stomachs. In China, unlike the West, traditional medicine, which is herbalism, never fell out of favor. There, herbal medicine is a fine and sophisticated science. We in the West just use the whole ginger root. The Chinese, on the other hand, use ginger's papery brown skin to treat people with gas. They bruise and then juice the leaves, using the resulting liquid to increase the appetite of people with no taste for food, and they use the peeled root to treat nausea, dysentery, and to act as an overall digestive stimulant. After all, the Chinese have been working with ginger as medicine for some 4000 years; it is only reasonable that they should know it a bit better than we should.

 Ginger was first grown in the Caribbean and Latin America in the late 1500s, and the creeping plant has since become a mainstay in the practice of local herbalists. In Mexico, the fresh root is grated, mixed with water, and taken after meals to ensure good digestion. In Trinidad, the root is made into tea to treat indigestion and morning sickness. In Brazil, it is used to treat cramps, nausea, and gas. The story is basically the same around the world: whenever intestinal flu sets in, the symptoms are best treated with ginger.
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Ginger of Greeks and Romans.

 Ginger Zingiber officinale Willd.Rosc PlantGinger is a tropical plant. It originated in Asia, but could be found throughout Africa and Arabia long before people gave up on the idea that the world was flat. The Greeks and Romans used a lot of ginger, which is said to have come from India via Arabia by way of the Red Sea. The plant appears in European records dating to the 11th century, as it was among the heavily taxed spices on which the nobility made a few bucks. Marco Polo mentioned seeing it on his trip to Asia in 1280. It arrived in England early - herbalists from the 11th century onward wrote of it.

 Ginger was popular among European herbalists right off the bat. This was particularly true in England, perhaps because ginger's healing effects on the body were especially welcome in the lovely cold weather typical of the British Isles. Gerard had this to say about it:

 Ginger, as Dioscorides reporteth, is right good with meat in sauces, or otherwise in conditures: for it is of an heating and digesting quality; it gently looseth the belly, and is profitable for the stomach, and effectually opposeth itself against all darkness of the light; answering the qualities and effects of pepper. It is to be considered that candied green or condited ginger is hot and moist in qualities, provioking Venerie; and being dried, it heateth and drieth in the third degree.

 "Provioking Venerie" means making people randy. Although it was Gerard's feeling that ginger heated more than the stomach, most of the records show ginger being used to treat that organ rather than more southerly parts.

 The British transplanted ginger from Asia to their New World colonies, where it could be cultivated for the domestic market at a cheaper price. Today the best ginger comes from Jamaica; it was first grown there on British plantations.

 Like many of the more famous medicinal plants, ginger was initially hauled from Asia to Europe and on to the New World because of its culinary use. Candied, the fragrant root found its way into cookies, cakes, and confections. In days gone by, fine cuisine enjoyed by the nobility, was an extravagant and highly organized affair. The upper classes were known to overindulge, and ginger was used to settle their abused stomachs. Here we see the fine line between food and medicine. Herbalists of, say, the 16th century prescribed ginger tea for upset stomachs, and so that's what thoughtful hostesses served to their guests. Ginger cookies were originally a digestive biscuit intended to bring relief to those who had eaten too much.

 To this day, in several parts of the world, you will find ginger made into condiments and served with the meal. This is a piece of native wisdom that makes a lot of sense. Three examples of this are the chutneys served with just about everything in India, the candied ginger served with after-dinner cheese in Latin America. That is preventative medicine at its best.

 Ginger Root Zingiber OfficinalisCAS 84696-15-1It is in the area of intestinal upset that ginger comes to the fore, whether that upset is due to pregnancy, the intestinal flu, or the motion of a car, boat, or airplane. Ginger has the ability to quell the queasiness that usually proceeds vomiting. As none of us enjoys throwing up and just about all of us feel like it at one time or another, ginger should be a must both on the spice rack and in the medicine cabinet in every home.
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Ginger Traditional and Current Uses.

Traditional Use of Ginger.

 Cultivated for millennia in both China and India, ginger reached the West at least 2,000 years ago. Most of the thousands of prescriptions in Chinese traditional medicine (TCM) are combinations of many herbs; ginger is used in nearly half of them to mediate the effects of other ingredients as well as to stimulate the appetite and calm the stomach. In European herbal traditions, ginger is primarily used to stop nausea and quiet an upset stomach.
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Current Uses of Ginger.

 Ginger Root Zingiber OfficinalisCAS 84696-15-1Ginger is now recognized for helping to treat stomach upset and prevent symptoms of motion sickness. It has been studied for its antibacterial, antifungal, pain-relieving, anti-ulcer, antitumor, and other properties. Six clinical studies have looked at ginger's potential to reduce motion sickness. Four European studies reported positive results, while two American studies gave negative findings. In one English study, thirty-six volunteers were given either ginger or a common anti-motion sickness drug. When blindfolded and subjected to time in a spinning chair, those who took ginger held out an average of 5.5 minutes, while those who took the conventional drug lasted about 3.5 minutes before becoming ill. Another study involved eighty naval cadets at sea. Those who took a placebo developed seasickness. Those who were given gingerroot capsules had fewer cold sweats and less nausea. A 1988 NASA study that tested ginger in forty-two volunteers, however, concluded it was ineffective in relieving motion sickness. Clearly, more studies are needed.Ginger Root is also used to treat nausea related to both motion sickness and morning sickness. Ginger has been found to be even more effective than Dramamine?in curbing motion sickness, without causing drowsiness. Ginger's anti-inflammatory properties help relieve pain and reduce inflammation associated with arthritis, rheumatism and muscle spasms. Ginger's therapeutic properties effectively stimulate circulation of the blood, removing toxins from the body, cleansing the bowels and kidneys, and nourishing the skin. Other uses for Ginger Root include the treatment of asthma, bronchitis and other respiratory problems by loosening and expelling phlegm from the lungs. Ginger Root may also be used to help break fevers by warming the body and increasing perspiration.

 If you suffer from travel-related nausea, bring some ginger candy along on your next trip. Ginger has been proven to be more effective in treating travel sickness than Dramamine!

 In a rather politically incorrect experiment, some nasty scientists fed dogs copper sulfate and found that ginger extracts stopped the profuse vomiting that would have normally attended the dogs' being poisoned. This may not have been good news to the dogs who needed to throw up the poison in order not to die, but it is for people who are suffering from less serious intestinal distress.

 Ginger also has been found to increase gastric juice secretion and the production of hypochloride. This means that food is digested more quickly, creating an unfriendly environment for bacteria that otherwise could send you to the toilet for a week or more. Along these lines, chemicals in ginger have been proven to knock out the sort of bacteria that cause 'Delhi belly' and 'Montezuma's revenge'. One of the classic treatments for bacterial dysentery in the tropics is ginger, and people there are well advised to use this cheap and effective cure.

 The key to ginger's use in cases of intestinal flu due to bacteria, and indeed in cases of food poisoning, may lie in its high content of volatile oil. The root may contain as much as three percent volatile oil, which is a lot for a plant. When you make ginger tea, you will even see oil floating on the top of the water in which you boiled the root. Volatile oils have a powerful bacteria-killing capacity, and it seems probable that as the volatile oil floats down the digestive tract, it kills bacteria along the way.

 When you are sick because some varmint has moved into your guts, ginger is the perfect cure. First, it will kill the invader, and second, it will soothe the nerves that are causing the indescribably horrible sensation know as nausea. One of the phenomena that people who work in the health business are seeing lately is flus, both intestinal and respiratory, that last a really long time with periodic flare-ups. If you are using ginger to treat an intestinal flu, keep right on using it even after you have lost all flu symptoms, say a week or more. This may ensure that the flu won't come back.

 Typical illnesses treated with ginger include bacterial dysentery, cholera, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, chills, cramps, and lack of appetite. If you have intestinal flu, you probably have all the above-mentioned symptoms; the good news is that you can get rid of them and maybe even their cause with a cupful of ginger tea.
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Reference:
  • 1.Ginger,a traditional herb with hot nature for lung governs,its botanical introduction,uses and applications from ancient epoch till today,and stories.

♥The article and literature were edited by Herbalist of MDidea Extracts Professional.It runs a range of descriptions about the titled herb and related phytochemicals, including comprehensive information related, summarized updating discoveries from findings of herbalists and clinical scientists from this field.The electronic data information published at our official website https://www.mdidea.com and https://www.mdidea.net, we tried to update it to latest and exact as possible.
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Available Product
  • Name:Ginger Extract
  • Serie No:R010.
  • Specifications:10:1,Gingerols 2.5%.5% HPLC
  • INCI Name:ZINGIBER OFFICINALE EXTRACT
  • EINECS/ELINCS No.:283-634-2
  • CAS:84696-15-1,Gingerols,1391-73-7.
  • Chem/IUPAC Name:Zingiber Officinalis Extract is an extract of the roots of the ginger,Zingiber officinalis,Zingiberaceae
  • Other Names:Zingiber officinale ROSC.,Zingiber officinale (Willd.)Rosc,Rhizoma Zingiberis,African ginger,Black ginger,Canton ginger,Cochin ginger,Common ginger,Dried Ginger,Garden ginger,Gingembre,Imber,Jamaican ginger,race ginger,Sheng Jiang,Gan Jiang,Pao Jiang,Jiang.

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Ginger Extract Root INCI Name Zingiber Officinalis Extract EINECS ELINCS No 283-634-2 CAS 84696-15-1 Gingerols 1391-73-7

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