Common Knowledge:27.What is a Saturated Extract?

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Common Knowledge When a botanical is extracted, its phytochemicals (solutes) are dissolved into a carrier solvent (known in old world terminology as a menstruum). In our methodology, no one solvent is adequate to extract the "whole" of the botanical's phytochemical nature.

27.What is a Saturated Extract?

When a botanical is extracted, its phytochemicals (solutes) are dissolved into a carrier solvent (known in old world terminology as a menstruum). In our methodology, no one solvent is adequate to extract the "whole" of the botanical's phytochemical nature. Therefore, we perform multiple extractions of the herbal material with various food grade solvents in order to extract the "complete-spectrum" of the herb's phytochemical nature. Each one of these solvents can only dissolve a specific amount of solute per liter, at which point, it is said to be 'saturated'. We therefore provide an ample amount of solvent to completely exhaust the herb of the phytochemicals the particular solvent can dissolve. However, this 'ample' amount of solvent would make for a weak extract if it were intended as a finished product. Therefore, after pressing the liquid phytochemical laden solvent from the herb material (solvent and dissolved solutes otherwise known as an extract), we remove the solvent (but not the phytochemicals) through evaporation at low temperature and under vacuum conditions. As the solvent is being removed, we provide a second replacement solvent for the phytochemicals to dissolve into. This recombination of solutes with replacement solvent is then microencapsulated by a surface active agents such as lecithin or natural plant saponins.

 Any solvent, is capable of dissolving only specific types of molecules, and only to the saturation point. Regular extracts are caught in a paradox. The more solvent they use to more fully they exhaust the herb of its phytochemicals, the more dilute the extract becomes. Likewise, if they try to use a little solvent to try and make a concentrated extract (as in fluid extracts with their 1:1 ratio), they will have provided a poor extraction of the herb, since you cannot extract past the saturation point of the solvent, and hence, solutes (phytochemicals) will be left behind. Some manufacturers evaporate the solvent out of the extract and send it back down their packed column to absorb more phytochemicals, but alas, all the extracted phytochemicals end up precipitating because the solvent which held them in solution, has been evaporated away. If they are making a liquid product, the precipitate is then filtered out and discarded because they wouldn't want any clumps in their finished product.

 MDidea extraction process is tailored to each botanical from the start in order to produce Holistic (Wholistic) Full-Spectrum Extractions. Also, the finished extracts have a concentration of solutes beyond that which a saturated solution can hold. How is this possible? The answer is through the processes of vacuum evaporation of solvent with microencapsulation of solutes into an emulsion. Without encapsulating the dissolved solutes into tiny spheres, the solutes would precipitate out of solution as the solvent is removed, since there would be more solutes than the remaining liquid carrier could hold. This is what happens with other manufacturers who try to remove solvents and do not have the expertise necessary to form microspheres in complex mixtures.

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